Virginia Tech®home

Regulatory costs on U.S. salmonid farms

The economic effects of the implementation of regulations on aquaculture farms in the United States, while of concern, are not well understood. A national survey was conducted of salmonid (trout and salmon) farms in 17 states of the United States to measure on‐farm regulatory costs and to identify which regulations were the most costly to this industry segment. The response rate was 63%, with a coverage rate of 94.5% of the U.S. production of salmonids. Results from the study on the regulatory costs on U.S. salmonid farms have been published and are available through open access in the Journal of the World Aquaculture Society (Volume 50, Issue 3, June 2019). 

Journal Article: Regulatory costs on U.S. salmonid farms

In addition, a series of fact sheets and one page infographics have been developed summarizing the results from this study by region and for the respective states included in the study. The factsheets have been hosted on the Western Regional Aquaculture website. Links to the fact sheets and infographics can be found below:

 
 
Fact Sheet Infographics
Regional
National Findings

Color

Black & White

Coastal States Findings

(California, Maine, Oregon, Washington)

Color

Black & White

Midwest States Findings

(Missouri, Nebraska)

Color

Black & White

Western Region Findings

(California, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, Utah, Washington)

Color

Black & White

States
Colorado

Color

Black & White

Idaho

Color

Black & White

Michigan

Color

Black & White

New York

Color

Black & White

North Carolina

Color

Black & White

Ohio

Color

Black & White

Pennsylvania

Color

Black & White

Utah

Color

Black & White

Virginia

Color

Black & White

West Virginia

Color

Black & White

Wisconsin

Color

Black & White

We would like to thank all of the individuals who contributed to the planning, implementation, and completion of this study; particularly our project collaborators Fred Conte, Gunnar Knapp, William Hanshumaker, as well as subject matter experts from USDA Veterinary Services: Kathleen Hartman, Kamina Johnson, Lori Gustafson, and Lynn Creekmore. In addition, Debra Sloan, Jeff Hinshaw, Chris Weeks, and Matthew Smith should all be recognized for their efforts and contributions. We especially thank the producers who participated in the study for their time and contributing their data. 

This study was funded by the Western Regional Aquaculture Center Agreement Award No. 2014-38500-22309, The United States Trout Farmers Association, and USDA-APHIS Cooperative Agreement Award No. 422526. Findings and conclusions of this study have not been formally disseminated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and should not be construed to represent any agency determination or policy.